Go Green: Why You Should Grow Your Own Produce

I know what you might be thinking: “It takes too much time and I have no space, and besides, I’m a total atomic orange thumb, not a green thumb. I could never grow my own produce.”

Yeah, yeah.

Growing your own produce doesn’t have to be a full time job. You can grow in pots, which throws out the weeding problem for the most part and helps conserve space. Read up on how to grow, plant, and water your new plants, and ask the experts. You can also buy plants that have already started growing, which helps out a lot if you don’t know how or when to plant.

But besides all that, there are a lot of beneficial reasons that you should consider when deciding whether to grow your own produce at home or not.

You Can Save Money
If you live in an area like I do where produce has to be shipped in mostly, then you know that grocery store prices are fairly expensive, and we all know that prices on everything are rising. Growing your own veggies and such carries some investment, sure, but over the long run, it can probably save you money when you go to the grocery store.

And anyway, who couldn’t use a little extra money?

No Pesticides, No Engineering, Always Fresh
You know exactly what has come in contact with your produce. You know if there have been any chemicals used and if so, just what they are. You know that they are all-natural and healthy to eat for you and your family. And, best of all, you always know just how fresh they are. Yum!

Satisfaction
I don’t know about you, but I get personal satisfaction out of making something with my own hands. Gardening is no different. You have to help cultivate and grow the plants, and by doing so, you get the satisfaction of knowing you personally provided that food your eating, that you helped create it.

By homegrowing your veggies and fruits, you get that personal satisfaction of doing something and seeing the actual physical results of your labor, and how often do you get to say that?

The Environment Likes It
Plants help clean up the soil and the air, and they add oxygen to the air as well, which, if you haven’t heard, is something we all desperately need to live.

Plus, you can add them to a compost heap when they are dead or add what you prune to the compost heap and help make the soil richer.

If you have a little bit of gardening knowledge, you might find this product useful: SHTF Victory Garden.

It is a seed bank that includes many of the vegatables that you probably eat frequently, and the seeds stay good for up to four years. They even include a book to tell you how to grow your garden properly.

Sources:
Personal Experience